Prisoners’ Lives in the Hands of Corrections Officers: When COVID, Labour Conditions, and Health Collide

By: Emily Marra, Hen Povereni, and Natasha McMillan  On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a global pandemic.[1] This sparked a dialogue regarding one of society’s most ill-protected and often forgotten populations: incarcerated individuals. Abolitionists have long argued that systems of incarceration …

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Carceral Feminism, Femonationalism and Quarantine

For decades, state structures have been heavily invested in two harmful, contemporary modes of so-called “feminist” state intervention: carceral feminism and femonationalism. Both “feminisms” advance and legitimize policing, incarceration and immigration controls in the name of women’s liberation.

Emergent-Seas: Ea mai ke kai mai

by Kauwila Mahi A contribution to Abolition’s conversation on “States of Emergency/Emergence: Learning from Mauna Kea” (read the call here) Emergent-Sea, EA turning like the page Emergency politics keep us in a cage Emergent-cease and desist through prayers and tu-te-lage Emergent-seize the LAND BACK. During …

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Secure schools and prison abolition in the UK: During Covid-19 and beyond

By Zoe Luba A largely residential suburb in southeast England, located an hour-and-a-half train ride from London, houses three different prisons for children and youth from across the United Kingdom: HMP Cookham Wood, HMP Rochester, and Medway Secure Training Centre. Barbed wire fences enclose …

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Radical Mothering for Abolitionist Futures Post-COVID-19

mothers trapped within the prison industrial complex in one way or another have been modeling what it looks like to integrate care work (often conceived of as “service”) and political organizing as part of a collective, revolutionary project.mothers trapped within the prison industrial complex in one way or another have been modeling what it looks like to integrate care work and political organizing as part of a collective, revolutionary project.