Prisoners’ Lives in the Hands of Corrections Officers: When COVID, Labour Conditions, and Health Collide

By: Emily Marra, Hen Povereni, and Natasha McMillan  On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a global pandemic.[1] This sparked a dialogue regarding one of society’s most ill-protected and often forgotten populations: incarcerated individuals. Abolitionists have long argued that systems of incarceration …

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When They See Us

Central Park Five Syllabus: A Supplementary Reading List 

As NYC-born and raised educators, organizers and activists who work on issues relating to race, class, criminalization and youth justice, we were deeply touched by the Netflix series When They See Us, directed by Ava DuVernay. Based on the case of the Central Park Five, a group of black and Latinx teenagers who were coerced into confession, wrongly convicted and harshly sentenced to prison for the alleged rape of a white woman, this series captures the socio-political and economic atmosphere of New York City in the eighties and nineties.
… The Netflix series touches on themes relating to race, class, gender, criminalization of youth and media moral panics, which we want to help students further unpack. The readings in this syllabus are meant to supplement the documentary series and allow students to engage critically with the historical and contemporary criminalization of working-class youth of color. We hope that youth educators will add to this syllabus and continue these important conversations inside and outside of the classroom. It is through expanding our knowledge about the past and present that we can organize against the criminalization and incarceration of our youth. Please use #exonerated5syllabus or #WhenTheySeeUsSyllabus to share.

Abolitionist University Studies: An Invitation

We think it’s time to take up an abolitionist approach to the university. We can’t do it without you. But you’re anxious, as are we, when faced with the uncertainty of what that might entail. We’ve got that in common. Maybe you rather like universities and believe in their value. Or maybe you simply need to have a job, and yours happens to be there. Maybe you’ve been a prison abolitionist since long before everyone was calling themselves one, and you’re concerned about the drift of the signifier “abolitionist” from a specific set of collective struggles to an individual mode of self-branding. Or maybe you saw what the Right did (and continues to do) with calls for the abolition of whiteness from the journal Race Traitor in the late 1990s and early 2000s. And so maybe you’re concerned that bringing the word abolition into too intimate a proximity with the university might offer ammunition to Republicans eager to continue their assaults on higher education and to Democrats eager to distance themselves from the Left.

Open access edition of Abolition Journal now available for download

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Seeking Art Submissions for Our Issue on Spirituality and Abolition

Abolition: A Journal of Insurgent Politics is seeking submissions by artists for our third issue, Spirituality and Abolition, to be edited by Ashon Crawley and Roberto Sirvent. Abolition conceptualizes art as another mode of knowledge creation and investigation, on par with other rigorous academic work. …

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