Abolition

A Journal & Community of Radical Theory & Practice​

"Abolition requires that we change one thing, which is everything. When one says prison abolition, one cannot be talking about only prison... It's building the future from the present in all the ways we can."

Ruth Wilson Gilmore

Abolition

A Journal & Community of Radical Theory & Practice​

"Abolition requires that we change one thing, which is everything.
When one says prison abolition, one cannot be talking about only prison...
It's building the future from the present in all the ways we can.​"

Ruth Wilson Gilmore

Calls for Solidarity

Voices from the Inside

Issue One: Abolishing Carceral Society

Our inaugual issue, published in 2019

Abolition Journal

A project for research, publishing, and study that encourage us to make the impossible possible, to seek transformation well beyond policy changes and toward revolutionary abolitionism

Order in print

From Common Notions

Read online

Via Open Joural Systems

A wonderful mix of provocative ideas married with art, to help us consider a world without prisons, policing, and surveillance... pushes us to ask a number of questions that are important to moving us toward an abolitionist horizon.
Mariame Kaba
founder of Project NIA, and cofounder of Chicago Freedom School
A crucial contribution... fighting against prisons and the death penalty as instruments of class rule, the journal amplifies the voices of the incarcerated, actively engages with organizers on the ground, and builds bridges across multiple movements.
Silvia Federici
author of Caliban and the Witch and Revolution at Point Zero
Continues the radical, democratic tradition started by abolitionists to speak truth to power... it is a matter of the greatest urgency to create and sustain a counter-public sphere and an alternative print culture to sustain and expand American democracy.
Manisha Sinha
author of The Slave's Cause: A History of Abolition James L. and Shirley A. Draper Chair in American History at the University of Connecticut

Recent writing series

Learning from Manua Kea

Abolition and Native Liberation

Abolition and the 2016 Elections